Author and artist Myriam Gurba joins co-hosts Eric Newman and Kate Wolf for a conversation about her new book Mean, which is receiving effusive praise across the literary, art, and mainstream presses — including a glowing review from last week’s guest, Jonathan Alexander, in the Los Angeles Review of Books. Billed as part true crime tale, part ghost story, part queer coming-of-age memoir — with all parts deformed by an epidemic of sexual assault and violence in Myriam’s hometown — it sounds a perfect fit for the zeitgeist. Only it’s the opposite; as Myriam explains, her love of language is disruptive, and empowering, a lifeline that even allows her to recognize, and commune with, the ghosts haunting our souls. Indeed, as Myriam, Kate, and Eric’s conversation turns to our on-going #MeToo moment, Myriam insists we cannot continue to reduce people to good or bad caricatures, our team versus the enemy; rather, we need to talk to each other, have compassion for the traumatized, and, if you’re really serious about trying to do some some good, deploy the type of deep psychological insight familiar to readers and writers of literature. Also, Jonathan Alexander drops by to recommend Jay McInerney’s latest novel Bright, Precious Days, the third installment of the Calloway Saga; set in NYC in-and-around the (declining) publishing industry during last decade’s financial collapse through the early Obama years. Jonathan says it’s top notch Mcinerney: delicious junk food for the literati, plus a front row seat for the decline of the American Empire!