by Steve Kenny

Geoff Nicholson

Geoff Nicholson is a contributing editor to the Los Angeles Review of Books. His books include the novels Bleeding London and The Hollywood Dodo and the nonfiction The Lost Art of Walking.
 

"It occurred to me, not exactly for the first time, that psychogeography didn't have much to do with the actual experience of walking. It was a nice idea, a clever idea, an art project, a conceit, but it had very little to do with any real walking, with any real experience of walking. And it confirmed for me what I'd really known all along, that walking isn't much good as a theoretical experience. You can dress it up any way you like, but walking remains resolutely simple, basic, analog. That's why I love it and love doing it. And in that respect — stay with me on this — it's not entirely unlike a martini. Sure you can add things to martinis, like chocolate or an olive stuffed with blue cheese or, God forbid, cotton candy, and similarly you can add things to your walks — constraints, shapes, notions of the mapping of utopian spaces — but you don't need to. And really, why would you? Why spoil a good drink? Why spoil a good walk?"

– Geoff Nicholson, The Lost Art of Walking

For a list of his LARB essays click [here]